Damage to the common peroneal nerve is what leads to common peroneal nerve dysfunction. Causes may include acute injury or medical conditions causing nerve damage. The common peroneal nerve affects the movement and sensation in the foot and leg. C

ommon peroneal nerve dysfunction may also be referred to as common peroneal nerve palsy or common peroneal neuropathy.

Causes and Risk Factors of Common Peroneal Nerve Dysfunction

The peroneal nerve is actually a nerve that branches off of the sciatic nerve. It controls movement of the lower leg and foot as well as the ability to feel. Common peroneal nerve damage is a form of peripheral neuropathy which can affect people of any age. Peripheral neuropathy is defined as nerve damage not affecting the brain or spinal cord.

Damage, whatever the cause, may lead to the dysfunction of the myelin sheath designed to protect the nerve cell. Damage may also destroy the entire nerve cell. Loss of sensation, lack of muscle control, and muscle atrophy may occur as a result. Common causes of common peroneal nerve dysfunction include:

  • Acute injury to the knee or leg
  • Fibula fracture (lower leg bone)
  • Long term use of a plaster-based cast causing severe restrictionperoneal nerve compression
  • Crossing the legs on a regular basis
  • Wearing knee high boots on a consistent basis
  • Nerve damage associated with anorexia nervosa
  • Nerve damage associated with diabetes
  • Nerve damage associated with exposure to certain toxins

Symptoms of Common Peroneal Nerve Dysfunction

  • Decrease in feeling in the lower leg or foot over time
  • “Drop foot” syndrome where one is not able to hold up the foot
  • A slapping of the foot when a step is taken caused by lack of control of the foot
  • Weakness in the ankles or feet
  • Dragging of the toes when walking
  • General mechanical problems when walking

Test to Determine Common Peroneal Nerve Dysfunction

Most forms of neuropathy are diagnosed using physical exams and a variety of tests such as an electromyography or MRI. The diagnosis of common peroneal nerve damage is no different. The health care provider will perform a physical exam and questionnaire before moving on to the battery of tests.

Treatment Options for Peroneal Nerve Dysfunction

Treatment depends on the underlying cause. It

may be an injury or a medical condition such as diabetes. Treatment options include treating the root cause as well as pain medication to treat painful symptoms. If the peroneal nerve is being compressed and the exact location can be identified, an expert Phoenix podiatrist such as Dr. Rick Jacoby can treat it effectively.

Call Valley Foot Surgeons today at (480) 994-5977 for treatment.Rich Text AreaToolbarBold (Ctrl B)Italic (Ctrl I)Strikethrough (Alt Shift D)Unordered list (Alt Shift U)Ordered list (Alt Shift O)Blockquote (Alt Shift Q)Align Left (Alt Shift L)Align Center (Alt Shift C)Align Right (Alt Shift R)Insert/edit link (Alt Shift A)Unlink (Alt Shift S)Insert More Tag (Alt Shift T)Proofread WritingToggle fullscreen mode (Alt Shift G)Show/Hide Kitchen Sink (Alt Shift Z)Insert Shortcode
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Damage to the common peroneal nerve is what leads to common peroneal nerve dysfunction. Causes may include acute injury or medical conditions causing nerve damage. The common peroneal nerve affects the movement and sensation in the foot and leg. Common peroneal nerve dysfunction may also be referred to as common peroneal nerve palsy or common peroneal neuropathy.
Causes and Risk Factors of Common Peroneal Nerve Dysfunction

The peroneal nerve is actually a nerve that branches off of the sciatic nerve. It controls movement of the lower leg and foot as well as the ability to feel. Common peroneal nerve damage is a form of peripheral neuropathy which can affect people of any age. Peripheral neuropathy is defined as nerve damage not affecting the brain or spinal cord.
Damage, whatever the cause, may lead to the dysfunction of the myelin sheath designed to protect the nerve cell. Damage may also destroy the entire nerve cell. Loss of sensation, lack of muscle control, and muscle atrophy may occur as a result. Common causes of common peroneal nerve dysfunction include:
Acute injury to the knee or leg
Fibula fracture (lower leg bone)
Long term use of a plaster-based cast causing severe restriction
Crossing the legs on a regular basis
Wearing knee high boots on a consistent basis
Nerve damage associated with anorexia nervosa
Nerve damage associated with diabetes
Nerve damage associated with exposure to certain toxins
Symptoms of Common Peroneal Nerve Dysfunction
Decrease in feeling in the lower leg or foot over time
“Drop foot” syndrome where one is not able to hold up the foot
A slapping of the foot when a step is taken caused by lack of control of the foot
Weakness in the ankles or feet
Dragging of the toes when walking
General mechanical problems when walking
Test to Determine Common Peroneal Nerve Dysfunction
Most forms of neuropathy are diagnosed using physical exams and a variety of tests such as an electromyography or MRI. The diagnosis of common peroneal nerve damage is no different. The health care provider will perform a physical exam and questionnaire before moving on to the battery of tests.
Treatment Options for Peroneal Nerve Dysfunction
Treatment depends on the underlying cause. It may be an injury or a medical condition such as diabetes. Treatment options include treating the root cause as well as pain medication to treat painful symptoms. If the peroneal nerve is being compressed and the exact location can be identified, an expert Phoenix podiatrist such as Dr. Rick Jacoby can treat it effectively.
Call Valley Foot Surgeons today at (480) 994-5977 for treatment.
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